Linearized Simulative Approach for the Investigation of a Friction-Induced Low-Frequency Brake Moan Oscillation Phenomenon Within Passenger Vehicle Front Axles

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearch

Abstract

Noise, Vibration and Harshness phenomena regarding a passenger vehicle’s brake and suspension system can imply a reduced sense of quality as well as significant warranty costs. In contrast to well-researched mid- to highfrequency
brake squeal, low-frequency vibrations have gained popularity only most recently. Brake moan is one of these effects, featuring frequencies from 350-600 Hz. Among others, independent wheel suspension systems at the front axle can exhibit moan-related oscillations. Here, evaluations imply high familiarity to disk brake squeal, which can be explained by a coupling of different eigenmodes of suspension and brake system, induced by the frictional contact between disk and pads. Consequently, simulation techniques used for squeal evaluation should be applicable for moan phenomena too. Hence, the linearized approach of the Complex Eigenvalue Analysis was investigated for a Finite Element model of a vehicle’s front corner. Parameter variations within a relevant operating range were performed for two different rim designs. A validation based on experimental tests reveals the simulative method’s ability to predict the eigenfrequency of characteristic torsional rim oscillations. However, stability was computed divergent to the systems’ real-life behaviors: Further examination and correct implementation of sensitive parameters seem necessary for a predictive application of this linearized, simulative approach.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of 8th Congress of the AAAA
Pages309-316
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)978-953-95097-2-7
Publication statusPublished - 20 Sep 2018
Event8th Congress of the Alps Adria Acoustic Association (AAAA) - Zagreb, Croatia
Duration: 20 Sep 201821 Sep 2018

Conference

Conference8th Congress of the Alps Adria Acoustic Association (AAAA)
CountryCroatia
CityZagreb
Period20/09/1821/09/18

Fingerprint

Front axles
Brakes
Friction
Wheels
Costs

Fields of Expertise

  • Mobility & Production

Cite this

Linearized Simulative Approach for the Investigation of a Friction-Induced Low-Frequency Brake Moan Oscillation Phenomenon Within Passenger Vehicle Front Axles. / Huemer-Kals, Severin; Pürscher, Manuel; Fischer, Peter.

Proceedings of 8th Congress of the AAAA. 2018. p. 309-316 2018-AAAA-ID-33.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearch

Huemer-Kals, S, Pürscher, M & Fischer, P 2018, Linearized Simulative Approach for the Investigation of a Friction-Induced Low-Frequency Brake Moan Oscillation Phenomenon Within Passenger Vehicle Front Axles. in Proceedings of 8th Congress of the AAAA., 2018-AAAA-ID-33, pp. 309-316, 8th Congress of the Alps Adria Acoustic Association (AAAA), Zagreb, Croatia, 20/09/18.
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abstract = "Noise, Vibration and Harshness phenomena regarding a passenger vehicle’s brake and suspension system can imply a reduced sense of quality as well as significant warranty costs. In contrast to well-researched mid- to highfrequencybrake squeal, low-frequency vibrations have gained popularity only most recently. Brake moan is one of these effects, featuring frequencies from 350-600 Hz. Among others, independent wheel suspension systems at the front axle can exhibit moan-related oscillations. Here, evaluations imply high familiarity to disk brake squeal, which can be explained by a coupling of different eigenmodes of suspension and brake system, induced by the frictional contact between disk and pads. Consequently, simulation techniques used for squeal evaluation should be applicable for moan phenomena too. Hence, the linearized approach of the Complex Eigenvalue Analysis was investigated for a Finite Element model of a vehicle’s front corner. Parameter variations within a relevant operating range were performed for two different rim designs. A validation based on experimental tests reveals the simulative method’s ability to predict the eigenfrequency of characteristic torsional rim oscillations. However, stability was computed divergent to the systems’ real-life behaviors: Further examination and correct implementation of sensitive parameters seem necessary for a predictive application of this linearized, simulative approach.",
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AB - Noise, Vibration and Harshness phenomena regarding a passenger vehicle’s brake and suspension system can imply a reduced sense of quality as well as significant warranty costs. In contrast to well-researched mid- to highfrequencybrake squeal, low-frequency vibrations have gained popularity only most recently. Brake moan is one of these effects, featuring frequencies from 350-600 Hz. Among others, independent wheel suspension systems at the front axle can exhibit moan-related oscillations. Here, evaluations imply high familiarity to disk brake squeal, which can be explained by a coupling of different eigenmodes of suspension and brake system, induced by the frictional contact between disk and pads. Consequently, simulation techniques used for squeal evaluation should be applicable for moan phenomena too. Hence, the linearized approach of the Complex Eigenvalue Analysis was investigated for a Finite Element model of a vehicle’s front corner. Parameter variations within a relevant operating range were performed for two different rim designs. A validation based on experimental tests reveals the simulative method’s ability to predict the eigenfrequency of characteristic torsional rim oscillations. However, stability was computed divergent to the systems’ real-life behaviors: Further examination and correct implementation of sensitive parameters seem necessary for a predictive application of this linearized, simulative approach.

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