Utility of serological biomarkers for giant cell arteritis in a large cohort of treatment-naïve patients

Blaž Burja, Julia Feichtinger, Katja Lakota, Gerhard G Thallinger, Snezna Sodin-Semrl, Tadeja Kuret, Žiga Rotar, Rok Ješe, Polona Žigon, Saša Čučnik, Polonca Mali, Sonja Praprotnik, Matija Tomšič, Alojzija Hočevar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Early diagnosis and treatment of giant cell arteritis (GCA) is crucial for preventing ischemic complications. Multiple serological markers have been identified; however, there is a distinct lack of predicting markers for GCA relapse and complications. Our main objective was to identify serological parameters in a large cohort of treatment-naïve GCA patients, which could support clinicians in evaluating the course of the disease. Clinical data was gathered, along with analyte detection using Luminex technology, ELISA, and nephelometry, among others. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis of analyte profiles were performed to determine delineation of GCA patients and healthy blood donors (HBDs). Highest, significantly elevated analytes in GCA patients were SAA (83-fold > HBDs median values), IL-23 (58-fold), and IL-6 (11-fold). Importantly, we show for the first time significantly changed levels of MARCO, alpha-fetoprotein, protein C, resistin, TNC, TNF RI, M-CSF, IL-18, and IL-31 in GCA versus HBDs. Changes in levels of SAA, CRP, haptoglobin, ESR, MMP-1 and MMP-2, and TNF-alpha were found associated with relapse and visual disturbances. aCL IgG was associated with limb artery involvement, even following adjustment for multiple testing. Principal component analysis revealed clear delineation between HBDs and GCA patients. Our study reveals biomarker clusters in a large cohort of patients with GCA and emphasizes the importance of using groups of serological biomarkers, such as acute phase proteins, MMPs, and cytokines (e.g. TNF-alpha) that could provide crucial insight into GCA complications and progression, leading to a more personalized disease management.

LanguageEnglish
JournalClinical Rheumatology
DOIs
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Aug 2018

Fingerprint

Giant Cell Arteritis
Biomarkers
Blood Donors
Matrix Metalloproteinases
Therapeutics
Principal Component Analysis
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Interleukin-11
Nephelometry and Turbidimetry
Resistin
Interleukin-23
Recurrence
Interleukin-18
Haptoglobins
Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Acute-Phase Proteins
alpha-Fetoproteins
Disease Management
Protein C
Cluster Analysis

Fields of Expertise

  • Human- & Biotechnology
  • Information, Communication & Computing

Treatment code (Nähere Zuordnung)

  • Basic - Fundamental (Grundlagenforschung)

Cite this

Utility of serological biomarkers for giant cell arteritis in a large cohort of treatment-naïve patients. / Burja, Blaž; Feichtinger, Julia; Lakota, Katja; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna; Kuret, Tadeja; Rotar, Žiga; Ješe, Rok; Žigon, Polona; Čučnik, Saša; Mali, Polonca; Praprotnik, Sonja; Tomšič, Matija; Hočevar, Alojzija.

In: Clinical Rheumatology, 24.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Burja, B, Feichtinger, J, Lakota, K, Thallinger, GG, Sodin-Semrl, S, Kuret, T, Rotar, Ž, Ješe, R, Žigon, P, Čučnik, S, Mali, P, Praprotnik, S, Tomšič, M & Hočevar, A 2018, 'Utility of serological biomarkers for giant cell arteritis in a large cohort of treatment-naïve patients' Clinical Rheumatology. DOI: 10.1007/s10067-018-4240-x
Burja, Blaž ; Feichtinger, Julia ; Lakota, Katja ; Thallinger, Gerhard G ; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna ; Kuret, Tadeja ; Rotar, Žiga ; Ješe, Rok ; Žigon, Polona ; Čučnik, Saša ; Mali, Polonca ; Praprotnik, Sonja ; Tomšič, Matija ; Hočevar, Alojzija. / Utility of serological biomarkers for giant cell arteritis in a large cohort of treatment-naïve patients. In: Clinical Rheumatology. 2018
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AU - Thallinger,Gerhard G

AU - Sodin-Semrl,Snezna

AU - Kuret,Tadeja

AU - Rotar,Žiga

AU - Ješe,Rok

AU - Žigon,Polona

AU - Čučnik,Saša

AU - Mali,Polonca

AU - Praprotnik,Sonja

AU - Tomšič,Matija

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N2 - Early diagnosis and treatment of giant cell arteritis (GCA) is crucial for preventing ischemic complications. Multiple serological markers have been identified; however, there is a distinct lack of predicting markers for GCA relapse and complications. Our main objective was to identify serological parameters in a large cohort of treatment-naïve GCA patients, which could support clinicians in evaluating the course of the disease. Clinical data was gathered, along with analyte detection using Luminex technology, ELISA, and nephelometry, among others. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis of analyte profiles were performed to determine delineation of GCA patients and healthy blood donors (HBDs). Highest, significantly elevated analytes in GCA patients were SAA (83-fold > HBDs median values), IL-23 (58-fold), and IL-6 (11-fold). Importantly, we show for the first time significantly changed levels of MARCO, alpha-fetoprotein, protein C, resistin, TNC, TNF RI, M-CSF, IL-18, and IL-31 in GCA versus HBDs. Changes in levels of SAA, CRP, haptoglobin, ESR, MMP-1 and MMP-2, and TNF-alpha were found associated with relapse and visual disturbances. aCL IgG was associated with limb artery involvement, even following adjustment for multiple testing. Principal component analysis revealed clear delineation between HBDs and GCA patients. Our study reveals biomarker clusters in a large cohort of patients with GCA and emphasizes the importance of using groups of serological biomarkers, such as acute phase proteins, MMPs, and cytokines (e.g. TNF-alpha) that could provide crucial insight into GCA complications and progression, leading to a more personalized disease management.

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