The effect of adsorbed carboxymethyl cellulose on the cotton fibre adsorption capacity for surfactant

Lidija Fras Zemljič*, Peer Stenius, Janne Laine, Karin Stana Kleinschek

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The research reported in this paper demonstrates that the capacity of cotton fibres to adsorb cationic surfactants as well as the rate of the adsorption process can be increased by adsorbing carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) onto the fibre surfaces; in addition, the adsorption can be restricted to the fibre surface. CMC was deposited by means of adsorption from an aqueous solution. The adsorption of N-cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) from an aqueous solution onto the CMC-modified fibres was measured using UV-spectrometric determination of the surfactant concentration in the solution. Adsorption onto the cotton fibres was studied in a weakly basic environment (pH 8.5) where cotton fibres are negatively charged and the CPC ion is positively charged. Modification of the fibres by adsorption of CMC introduces new carboxyl groups onto the fibre surfaces, thereby increasing the adsorption capacity of the fibres for CPC. The initial rate of adsorption of CPC increased proportionally with the amount of charge; however, this rate slowed down at high degrees of coverage on fibres with a high charge. The adsorption of cationic surfactant to the anionic surface groups was stoichiometric, with no indication of multilayer or admicelle formation. It was evident that the acidic group content of the fibres was the primary factor determining cationic surfactant adsorption to these fibres.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)655-663
Number of pages9
JournalCellulose
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acid groups
  • Adsorption capacity
  • Carboxymethyl cellulose
  • Conductometric titration
  • Cotton fibres
  • In fibres
  • Modification of fibres
  • Surfactant adsorption
  • UV spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Polymers and Plastics

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