System-Level EMI of an Artificial Router System with Multiple Radiators: Prediction and Validation

Wei Zhang, Javad Soleiman Meiguni, Kaustav Ghosh, Abhishek Patnaik, Morten Sorensen, Ahmad Hosseinbeig, David Pommerenke, Jacques Rollin, Jing Li, Liu Quian, Philippe Sochoux, DongHyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In a multimodule system, an increase in the number of radiating optical modules will increase the electromagnetic emissions. This article investigates the scaled tendency of the emissions in a router system loaded with hundreds of optical modules. An artificial router mimicking the real system was built to investigate this tendency. A patch antenna array mimics the radiation of the optical modules. It can be excited in in-phase and random-phase configurations. The measurement data verifies the theoretical analysis and the prediction from a statistical method without performing hundreds of different experiments on a real router. Assuming that all radiators are radiating at the same frequency and have similar radiation pattern with random phases, the average of the maximal directivity of the system will saturate if the number of radiators (N) is larger than 14. Furthermore, the average of the maximal electric field radiated will increase following a 10 log10N (dB) tendency
Original languageEnglish
Article number9141377
Pages (from-to)1601-1610
Number of pages10
JournalIEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Artificial system
  • averaged maximal directivity (< D-max >)
  • averaged maximal electric field (< E-max >)
  • electromagnetic interference (EMI)
  • maximal directivity (D-max)
  • maximal electric field (E-max)
  • optical modules
  • router system
  • scaling
  • total radiated power (TRP)
  • maximal directivity (D )
  • averaged maximal electric field (E )
  • averaged maximal directivity (D )
  • maximal electric field (E )

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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