Relative contributions of Solubility and Mobility to the Stability of Amorphous Solid Dispersions of poorly soluble drugs: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Amorphous solid dispersions are considered a promising formulation strategy for the oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs. The limiting factor for the applicability of this approach is the physical (in)stability of the amorphous phase in solid samples. Minimizing the risk of reduced shelf life for a new drug by establishing a suitable excipient/polymer-type from first principles would be desirable to accelerate formulation development. Here we perform Molecular
Dynamics simulations to determine properties of blends of eight different polymer-small molecule drug combinations for which stability data is available from a consistent set of literature data. We calculate thermodynamic factors (mixing energies) as well as mobilities (diffusion rates and roto-vibrational fluctuations). We find that either of the two factors, mobility and energetics, can
determine the relative stability of the amorphous form for a given drug. Which factor is rate limiting depends on physico-chemical properties of the drug and the excipients/polymers. The methods outlined here can be readily employed for an in-silico pre-screening of different excipients for a given
drug to establish a qualitative ranking of the expected relative stabilities, thereby accelerating and streamlining formulation development.
Original languageEnglish
Article number101
Number of pages20
JournalPharmaceutics
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jul 2018

Keywords

  • molecular dynamics simulation
  • Amorphous
  • physical stability
  • hydrogen-bond
  • molecular mobility
  • mixing energy
  • molecular interactions

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Relative contributions of Solubility and Mobility to the Stability of Amorphous Solid Dispersions of poorly soluble drugs: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this