Protein adsorption on various plasma-treated polyethylene terephthalate substrates

Nina Recek, Morana Jaganjac, Metod Kolar, Lidija Milkovic, Miran Mozetič, Karin Stana-Kleinschek, Alenka Vesel*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Protein adhesion and cell response to plasma-treated polymer surfaces were studied. The polymer polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was treated in either an oxygen plasma to make the surface hydrophilic, or a tetrafluoromethane CF 4 plasma to make the surface hydrophobic. The plasma source was radiofrequency (RF) discharge. The adsorption of albumin and other proteins from a cell-culture medium onto these surfaces was studied using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cellular response to plasma-treated surfaces was studied as well using an MTT assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fastest adsorption rate was found on the hydrophilic oxygen plasma-treated sample, and the lowest was found on the pristine untreated sample. Additionally, the amount of adsorbed proteins was higher for the oxygen-plasma-treated surface, and the adsorbed layer was more viscoelastic. In addition, cell adhesion studies support this finding because the best cell adhesion was observed on oxygen-plasma-treated substrates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12441-12463
Number of pages23
JournalMolecules
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cell adhesion
  • Oxygen and fluorine plasma treatment
  • Polymer surface modification
  • Protein adsorption
  • Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Chemistry (miscellaneous)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Drug Discovery
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

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