Novel Light-Responsive Biocompatible Hydrogels Produced by Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition

Katrin Unger, Paul Salzmann, Cecilia Masciullo, Marco Cecchini, Georg Koller, Anna Maria Coclite

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A novel multiresponsive hydrogel has been synthesized by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Hydrogels are known for their dynamic swelling response to aqueous environments. A chemical functionalization of the hydrogel surface was performed to add other stimuli-responsive functionalities and obtain a smart material that responds to two stimuli: light irradiation and exposure to aqueous environment. Modifying the hydrogel surface with solution-based methods is often problematic because of the damages caused by the permeation of solvents in the hydrogel. This issue is completely bypassed by the use of solvent-free techniques. Cross-linked polymers of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) were functionalized with azobenzene groups, as confirmed by IR spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Through photoisomerization of the azobenzene, the polarity within the hydrogel is modified and as a consequence the affinity to water. Light irradiation modifies the degree of swelling within thin hydrogel films from 13% before exposure to UV light to 25% after exposure. The possibility of controlling the degree and rate of swelling by light irradiation was never reported before on these time scales and can have exceptional implications for light-induced drug delivery or light-controlled microfluidic systems. The light-responsive hydrogels showed also biocompatibility, which makes them suitable for a great variety of applications as biomaterials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17408-17416
Number of pages9
JournalACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Volume9
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 May 2017

Fingerprint

Hydrogels
Hydrogel
Chemical vapor deposition
Swelling
Irradiation
Azobenzene
Photoisomerization
Intelligent materials
Biocompatible Materials
Drug delivery
Biocompatibility
Microfluidics
Permeation
Ultraviolet radiation
Infrared spectroscopy
Polymers
X ray photoelectron spectroscopy
Biomaterials
Water

Keywords

  • biocompatibility
  • hydrogels
  • iCVD
  • photoresponse
  • smart materials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Novel Light-Responsive Biocompatible Hydrogels Produced by Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition. / Unger, Katrin; Salzmann, Paul; Masciullo, Cecilia; Cecchini, Marco; Koller, Georg; Coclite, Anna Maria.

In: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9, No. 20, 24.05.2017, p. 17408-17416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Unger, Katrin ; Salzmann, Paul ; Masciullo, Cecilia ; Cecchini, Marco ; Koller, Georg ; Coclite, Anna Maria. / Novel Light-Responsive Biocompatible Hydrogels Produced by Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition. In: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. 2017 ; Vol. 9, No. 20. pp. 17408-17416.
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