Improvement of hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracking resistance of ultra-high strength steel screws and fasteners

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Among different forms of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC), hydrogen embrittlement (HE), or more specifically, hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracking
(HISCC) is the most critical form while dealing with high strength steel used for manufacturing of screws and fasteners(1). The downsizing trend of steel structures for
mobility applications to increase the efficiency and decrease CO2 emissions faces this problem, as it is well known that increasing the steel strength also increases its
susceptibility to HISCC. Thus, the screw strength class 10.9 (900 MPa yield and 1000 MPa tensile strength) is specified as the maximum for safety-related HISCC
resistance(2). The main project goal is to establish a controllable method for HISCC testing, which should lead to a better understanding of the embrittlement
mechanisms and to evaluate different microstructures, which are tempered martensite, bainite and pearlite by applying different heat treatments to achieve a tensile
strength of 1400 MPa or higher. The HISCC testing procedure is performed as the Incremental Step Load Test (ISLT) according to standard ASTM F 1624(3) with in situ
hydrogen charging by cathodic polarization and corrosion measurements.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 28 Sep 2019
EventAdvanced Materials Day 2019 - TU Graz, Graz, Austria
Duration: 26 Sep 201926 Sep 2019
http://ams.tugraz.at/AMD2019/

Other

OtherAdvanced Materials Day 2019
Country/TerritoryAustria
CityGraz
Period26/09/1926/09/19
Internet address

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