Implementing complex task allocation in a cytology lab via HCCM using Flexsim HC

Kanokporn Pongjetanapong, Michael O'Sullivan, Cameron Walker, Nikolaus Furian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Healthcare processes contain various complexities which make them difficult to model. These include: multiple-participant activities with flexible resourcing; dynamic task priorities; hierarchical skill levels of resources; and regular task pre-emption. Deciding which task in a care pathway a clinician next performs directly impacts on the performance of the healthcare process. The Hierarchical Control Conceptual Modeling (HCCM) approach has recently been proposed by Furian et al. [1] to provide a conceptual modelling framework purpose-built to explicitly model the decision-making structure in complex systems. Existing software packages for Discrete Event Simulation (DES) have been designed for conceptual models that consist of systems of queues. In particular, the lack of a module specifically designed to account for HCCM's control structure makes the implementation of a HCCM conceptual model in an off-the-shelf simulation package problematic. This research applies the HCCM framework to a real-world Cytology lab (with complex decision making for task allocations) and demonstrates how the resultant conceptual model can be implemented within an off-the-shelf healthcare simulation package (Flexsim HC). The primary goal is a proof-of-concept that the control mechanism, particular to the HCCM framework, can be implemented using such a simulation package.

LanguageEnglish
Pages139-154
Number of pages16
JournalSimulation modelling practice and theory
Volume86
DOIs
StatusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

Fingerprint

Cytology
Hierarchical Control
Task Allocation
Conceptual Modeling
Conceptual Model
Healthcare
Decision Making
Decision making
Simulation
Preemption
Discrete Event Simulation
Software Package
Discrete event simulation
Queue
Pathway
Complex Systems
Software packages
Large scale systems
Module
Resources

Keywords

  • Conceptual modelling
  • Cytology
  • Discrete-event simulation
  • Workflow

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Modelling and Simulation
  • Hardware and Architecture

Cite this

Implementing complex task allocation in a cytology lab via HCCM using Flexsim HC. / Pongjetanapong, Kanokporn; O'Sullivan, Michael; Walker, Cameron; Furian, Nikolaus.

In: Simulation modelling practice and theory, Vol. 86, 01.08.2018, p. 139-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Pongjetanapong, Kanokporn ; O'Sullivan, Michael ; Walker, Cameron ; Furian, Nikolaus. / Implementing complex task allocation in a cytology lab via HCCM using Flexsim HC. In: Simulation modelling practice and theory. 2018 ; Vol. 86. pp. 139-154.
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