Exoskeletons in the supermarket: Influences of comfort, strain relief and task-technology fit on retail workers' post-trial intention to use

Sandra Maria Siedl, Matthias Wolf, Martina Mara

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperpeer-review

Abstract

Many supermarket employees, such as shelf and warehouse workers, suffer from musculoskeletal disorders. Exoskeletons, that is, physical assistance systems that are worn on the body, could help. The conditions under which workers would be willing to use this new wearable technology, however, remain largely unclear. In this exploratory field study, 58 supermarket employees tested one or more out of five passive exoskeletons during their regular work. Perceived wearing comfort, extent of strain relief, and task-technology fit (i.e., how well the exoskeleton fit their current task requirements) were found to correlate significantly with post-trial intention to use. Soft exoskeletons were rated as preferable to rigid ones. Trying one of the latter also resulted in lower intention to use, which was revealed to be fully mediated by a better task-technology fit being ascribed to soft exoskeletons. Practical relevance of the results, study limitations and future research directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHRI 2021 - Companion of the 2021 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages397-401
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781450382908
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Mar 2021
Event2021 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, HRI 2021 - Virtual, Online, United States
Duration: 8 Mar 202111 Mar 2021

Publication series

NameACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction
ISSN (Electronic)2167-2148

Conference

Conference2021 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, HRI 2021
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityVirtual, Online
Period8/03/2111/03/21

Keywords

  • Comfort
  • Field study
  • Intention to use
  • Passive exoskeletons
  • Retail industry
  • Strain relief
  • Task-technology fit
  • Technology acceptance
  • Wearables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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