Continuum modeling of dislocation plasticity: theory, numerical implementation and validation by discrete dislocation simulations

S. Sandfeld, Thomas Hochrainer, P. Gumbsch, M. Zaiser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The development of advanced materials is driven by continuous progress in the synthesis and control of materials microstructure on sub-micrometer and nanometer scales. Confined to these length-scales, many materials show strikingly different physical properties from their bulk counterparts, like a strong increase in flow stress with decreasing size. This calls for an increased effort on physically motivated continuum theories which can predict size-dependent plasticity by accounting for length scales associated with the dislocation microstructure. An important recent development has been the formulation of a Continuum Dislocation Dynamics (CDD) Theory which provides a kinematically consistent continuum description of the dynamics of curved dislocation systems [1]. Here we present a brief overview of the CDD method and illustrate the implementation of the CDD by numerical examples, the bending of a thin film, the torsion of a wire, and the plastic flow around an elastic inclusion. Results are compared to three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics simulations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)623*632
JournalJournal of materials research
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

continuum modeling
plastic properties
Plasticity
continuums
Plastic flow
simulation
Microstructure
Torsional stress
microstructure
Physical properties
plastic flow
Wire
Thin films
torsion
micrometers
Computer simulation
physical properties
wire
inclusions
formulations

Keywords

  • Continuum theory
  • Dislocation
  • Plasticity
  • Simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Continuum modeling of dislocation plasticity: theory, numerical implementation and validation by discrete dislocation simulations. / Sandfeld, S.; Hochrainer, Thomas; Gumbsch, P.; Zaiser, M.

In: Journal of materials research, 2011, p. 623*632.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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