Bring Your Own Key for the Industrial Internet of Things

Thomas Ulz, Thomas Pieber, Christian Steger, Sarah Haas, Holger Bock, Rainer Matischek

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

High tech strategies such as Industry 4.0 and Smart Manufacturing require industrial devices to be connected to the Internet. This movement towards interconnected industrial devices poses significant security risks as confidential data must be transferred and stored using untrustworthy channels and cloud servers. End-to-end private key cryptography is suitable to protect the confidentiality, integrity, and authenticity of data. However, private key cryptography has some drawbacks such as the so-called key distribution problem. A possible solution, factory installed keys, are untrustworthy as the two partners relying on end-to-end cryptography can not be sure that no other party is in possession of the used keys. To overcome these problems, the Bring Your Own Key (BYOK) principle based on Near Field Communication (NFC) and dedicated secured hardware is presented in this paper.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2017 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Technology (ICIT)
Pages1430-1435
DOIs
StatusPublished - 2017
EventIEEE International Conference on Industrial Technology - Toronto, Canada
Duration: 22 Mar 201725 Mar 2017
http://icit2017.org/

Conference

ConferenceIEEE International Conference on Industrial Technology
Abbreviated titleICIT 2017
CountryCanada
CityToronto
Period22/03/1725/03/17
Internet address

Fingerprint

Cryptography
Industrial plants
Servers
Internet
Hardware
Internet of things
Industry
Near field communication

Keywords

  • Near Field Communication
  • Industrial Internet of Things
  • Cryptography
  • Keys
  • Security Controller

Cite this

Ulz, T., Pieber, T., Steger, C., Haas, S., Bock, H., & Matischek, R. (2017). Bring Your Own Key for the Industrial Internet of Things. In Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Technology (ICIT) (pp. 1430-1435) https://doi.org/10.1109/ICIT.2017.7915575

Bring Your Own Key for the Industrial Internet of Things. / Ulz, Thomas; Pieber, Thomas; Steger, Christian; Haas, Sarah; Bock, Holger; Matischek, Rainer.

Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Technology (ICIT). 2017. p. 1430-1435.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

Ulz, T, Pieber, T, Steger, C, Haas, S, Bock, H & Matischek, R 2017, Bring Your Own Key for the Industrial Internet of Things. in Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Technology (ICIT). pp. 1430-1435, IEEE International Conference on Industrial Technology, Toronto, Canada, 22/03/17. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICIT.2017.7915575
Ulz T, Pieber T, Steger C, Haas S, Bock H, Matischek R. Bring Your Own Key for the Industrial Internet of Things. In Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Technology (ICIT). 2017. p. 1430-1435 https://doi.org/10.1109/ICIT.2017.7915575
Ulz, Thomas ; Pieber, Thomas ; Steger, Christian ; Haas, Sarah ; Bock, Holger ; Matischek, Rainer. / Bring Your Own Key for the Industrial Internet of Things. Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Technology (ICIT). 2017. pp. 1430-1435
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