Background perception and comprehension of symbols conveyed through vibrotactile wearable displays

Granit Luzhnica, Eduardo Veas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Previous research has demonstrated the feasibility of conveying vibrotactile encoded information efficiently using wearable devices. Users can understand vibrotactile encoded symbols and complex messages combining such symbols. Such wearable devices can find applicability in many multitasking use cases. Nevertheless, for mul-titasking, it would be necessary for the perception and comprehension of vibrotactile information to be less attention demanding and not interfere with other parallel tasks. We present a user study which investigates whether high speed vibrotactile encoded messages can be perceived in the background while performing other concurrent attention-demanding primary tasks. The vibrotactile messages used in the study were limited to symbols representing letters of English Alphabet. We observed that users could very accurately comprehend vibrotactile such encoded messages in the background and other parallel tasks did not affect users performance. Additionally, the comprehension of such messages did also not affect the performance of the concurrent primary task as well. Our results promote the use of vibrotactile information transmission to facilitate multitasking.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication24rd International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces (IUI’19).
PublisherAssociation of Computing Machinery
Pages57-64
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Multitasking
Display devices
Conveying

Keywords

  • Skin reading

Cite this

Luzhnica, G., & Veas, E. (2019). Background perception and comprehension of symbols conveyed through vibrotactile wearable displays. In 24rd International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces (IUI’19). (pp. 57-64). Association of Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/3301275.3302282

Background perception and comprehension of symbols conveyed through vibrotactile wearable displays. / Luzhnica, Granit; Veas, Eduardo.

24rd International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces (IUI’19). . Association of Computing Machinery, 2019. p. 57-64.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

Luzhnica, G & Veas, E 2019, Background perception and comprehension of symbols conveyed through vibrotactile wearable displays. in 24rd International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces (IUI’19). . Association of Computing Machinery, pp. 57-64. https://doi.org/10.1145/3301275.3302282
Luzhnica G, Veas E. Background perception and comprehension of symbols conveyed through vibrotactile wearable displays. In 24rd International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces (IUI’19). . Association of Computing Machinery. 2019. p. 57-64 https://doi.org/10.1145/3301275.3302282
Luzhnica, Granit ; Veas, Eduardo. / Background perception and comprehension of symbols conveyed through vibrotactile wearable displays. 24rd International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces (IUI’19). . Association of Computing Machinery, 2019. pp. 57-64
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