Attempted Arm and Hand Movements can be Decoded from Low-Frequency EEG from Persons with Spinal Cord Injury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

We show that persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) retain decodable neural correlates of attempted arm and hand movements. We investigated hand open, palmar grasp, lateral grasp, pronation, and supination in 10 persons with cervical SCI. Discriminative movement information was provided by the time-domain of low-frequency electroencephalography (EEG) signals. Based on these signals, we obtained a maximum average classification accuracy of 45% (chance level was 20%) with respect to the five investigated classes. Pattern analysis indicates central motor areas as the origin of the discriminative signals. Furthermore, we introduce a proof-of-concept to classify movement attempts online in a closed loop, and tested it on a person with cervical SCI. We achieved here a modest classification performance of 68.4% with respect to palmar grasp vs hand open (chance level 50%).

Original languageEnglish
Article number7134
Pages (from-to)7134
JournalScientific reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 May 2019

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Hand Strength
Spinal Cord Injuries
Electroencephalography
Arm
Hand
Pronation
Supination
Motor Cortex
Cervical Cord

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Fields of Expertise

  • Human- & Biotechnology

Cite this

Attempted Arm and Hand Movements can be Decoded from Low-Frequency EEG from Persons with Spinal Cord Injury. / Ofner, Patrick; Schwarz, Andreas; Pereira, Joana; Wyss, Daniela; Wildburger, Renate; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 9, No. 1, 7134, 09.05.2019, p. 7134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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