Addressing H-Material Interaction in Fast Diffusion Materials—A Feasibility Study on a Complex Phase Steel

Agustina Massone, Armin Manhard, Andreas Drexler, Christian Posch, Werner Ecker, Verena Maier-Kiener, Daniel Kiener

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is one of the main limitations in the use of advanced high-strength steels in the automotive industry. To have a better understanding of the interaction between hydrogen (H) and a complex phase steel, an in-situ method with plasma charging was applied in order to provide continuous H supply during mechanical testing in order to avoid H outgassing. For such fast-H diffusion materials, only direct observation during in-situ charging allows for addressing H effects on materials. Different plasma charging conditions were analysed, yet there was not a pronounced effect on the mechanical properties. The H concentration was calculated while using a simple analytical model as well as a simulation approach, resulting in consistent low H values, below the critical concentration to produce embrittlement. However, the dimple size decreased in the presence of H and, with increasing charging time, the crack propagation rate increased. The rate dependence of flow properties of the material was also investigated, proving that the material has no strain rate sensitivity, which confirmed that the crack propagation rate increased due to H effects. Even though the H concentration was low in the experiments that are presented here, different technological alternatives can be implemented in order to increase the maximum solute concentration.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4677
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalMaterials
Volume13
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Advanced high-strength steels
  • Hydrogen embrittlement
  • In-situ testing
  • Plasma charging
  • Scanning electron microscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

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